Research Notes

Cluttering and stuttering: are they interrelated or separate disorders?

David Ward, School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, UK

for brevity, all references are given by hyperlinks, leading to the original sources.

The answer to this interesting and recurring question begins with the fundamental issue as to what is, and is not, cluttering. Earlier research implicated executive functioning, whilst more recently some have conceived cluttering as a language based disorder. The International Cluttering Association’s (2018) TPA-CC model reflects a synthesis of a range of thinking on definition, whilst St Louis and Schulte’s lowest common denominator definition is arguably the ‘safest’ (most constrained). Here, cluttering is viewed as a rate-based disorder and language and executive functioning variables are excluded, although they may both appear as concomitants. 

続きを読む: Cluttering and stuttering: are they interrelated or separate disorders?

Imaging genetics research in stuttering: Connecting the dots

Ho Ming Chow1 and Soo-Eun Chang2
1
Communication Sciences and Disorders Program, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 
2Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Stuttering is widely considered as a neurodevelopmental disorder, an umbrella term comprising childhood-onset disorders that affect the development of specific abilities, including executive control, language, and motor function, with no obvious cause. Like many neurodevelopmental disorders, the etiology of stuttering is not fully known and is likely to be complex. 

続きを読む: Imaging genetics research in stuttering: Connecting the dots

Report on transcranial magnetic stimulation in persistent developmental stuttering

Martin Sommer
University Medical Center Göttingen, Germany

Structural imaging data suggest a disconnection of speech relevant brain areas as an underlying neurological correlate of persistent developmental stuttering. We wondered how this translates into measurable dysfunctions of speech preparation. To study this, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation over the part of the motor cortex controlling the tongue, a key articulatory muscle.

続きを読む: Report on transcranial magnetic stimulation in persistent developmental stuttering

Psychopharmacological approaches for stuttering

Gerald A. Maguire, University of California, Riverside School of Medicine

Although no medication is FDA approved for stuttering, several studies have shown certain medications to have beneficial effects on reducing the severity of stuttering symptoms. Different classes of medications have been investigated, but those with dopamine blocking activity have been shown in numerous trials to have positive effects on stuttering. These medications are FDA approved in the United States (and hold similar approval in most countries) for other conditions and their safety profiles are well established in the relevant disorders.

続きを読む: Psychopharmacological approaches for stuttering

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