IFA Congresses

A Preliminary Analysis of Interaction Characteristics Between Chronic Stuttering Japanese Children and Their Mothers

A Preliminary Analysis of Interaction Characteristics Between Chronic Stuttering Japanese Children and Their Mothers

Keiko Gongdo1, Yoko Walaba2, Sumiko Inoue2,3 Megumi Iizawa3, and Hiroshi Fujino4
1Department of Early Childhood Education, St. Margaret's Junior College, 4-29-23, Kugayama, Suginami-ku, Tokyo, 168-8626, Japan
2The Research Institute for the Education of Exceptional Children , Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuilfita-machi, Koganei-city, Tokyo, 184-8501, Japan
3R&D Center, PIGEON Corporation, 6-20-4, Kinunodai, Yawara-mura, Tsukuba-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 300-2495, Japan
4Department of Education for Children with Disabilities, F uculty of Education, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 NukuiKita-machi, Koganei-city, Tokyo, 184-8501, Japan

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study was to compare interaction characteristics between a group of 9-year-old Japanese stuttering children (N :3) and their mothers during free play to those of a control group of nonstuttering children (N :3) and their mothers. A 10-minute play session for each pair was analyzed in terms of a number of utterances, number of topic initiations, MLU, a number of interruptions and conversational functions. Subjects in the stuttering group showed fewer interruptions during the conversation than the subjects in the non-stuttering group. Conversational functions varied among subjects; however, 2 mothers of the stuttering group showed a tendency to control their children’s behaviors.

Read more: A Preliminary Analysis of Interaction Characteristics Between Chronic Stuttering Japanese Children...

Fluency Development and Temperament in Fluent Children and Children Who Stutter

Fluency Development and Temperament in Fluent Children and Children Who Stutter

Peter Howell1, Stephen Davis1, Hina Patel1, Paul Cuniffe1, Deborah Downing-Wilson1, James Au-Yeung1 and Roberta Williams2
1University College London, 26 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AP
2City University, Northampton Square, London EC1V OHB

SUMMARY

Some interim results of a longitudinal study into indicators of fluency development are reported. A variety of language tests were performed. OCDI (Oxford Communication Development Inventory) scores were obtained at about 18 months and errors in naming pictures were obtained on a group of the children around this age. MLU (mean length of utterance) and a receptive measure of syntax (ROST - Reception of Syntax Test) were obtained when the children were around three years. CD1 correlated negatively with picture naming errors and this might reflect lexical development. MLU correlated with ROST score and this might reflect syntactic development. Measures of temperament obtained at 3 years did not correlate markedly with any language measure. It is concluded that there are two language factors that affect fluency development (lexical and syntactic), neither of which is related to temperament. In older fluent children and children who stutter temperament was found to differentiate the groups (CD1, MLU and picture naming are not appropriate tests for these older children). It is concluded that temperament may differentiate children who stutter from fluent speakers independent of their language performance.

Read more: Fluency Development and Temperament in Fluent Children and Children Who Stutter

A Temporal Analysis of Disfluencies in Children Who Stutter Close to Onset and Controls

A Temporal Analysis of Disfluencies in Children Who Stutter Close to Onset and Controls

Patricia Sandrieder, Ulrich Natke, Melanie van Ark, Reinhard Pietrowsky and Karl Theodor Kalveram
Heinrich-Heine-University Diisseldotf, Institute of Experimental Psychology, Universitiitsstrasse I, 40225 Diisseldorf, Germany

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal proportion of normal disfluencies in children who stutter (CWS) and those who do not (CWNS). The participants of the study were 12 children who do stutter and were close to onset of stuttering, and a control group. The frequency and duration of stuttering-like disfluencies (SLD) and other disfluencies (OD), including pauses were analyzed from audio- and video-taped speech samples consisting of at least 1000 syllables. No significant differences in the proportion of OD were found for CWS and CWNS or for CWS with or without remission. OD are shown to be highly significant dependent on age.

Read more: A Temporal Analysis of Disfluencies in Children Who Stutter Close to Onset and Controls

Negotiation Patterns of Families with Stuttering and Non-Stuttering Children

Negotiation Patterns of Families with Stuttering and Non-Stuttering Children

Christa L. Shuman, M. A., and A. Richard Mallard, Ph. D./CCC-SLP

Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study was to determine if families with stuttering children and families with non-stuttering children differed for the variables of number of turns, number of turns with questions, number of interruptions, or total negotiation time "during a negotiation task. The experimental (S) group included ten families with a child who stuttered and the control (NS) group included ten families with children who did not stutter matched to children in the experimental group. Significant differences were not found for turns, interruptions, turns with questions, or total negotiation time. A significant interaction difference existed between the groups for number of interruptions.

Read more: Negotiation Patterns of Families with Stuttering and Non-Stuttering Children

Conversation Analysis of Children Who Stutter and Parents Who Stutter

Conversation Analysis of Children Who Stutter and Parents Who Stutter

John A. Tetnowski1, Jack S. Damico1, Jennifer A. Bathel1 & Thomas C. Franklin2
1University of Louisiana at Lafayette, R0. Box 43] 70, Lafayette, LA 70504-3170 USA
2Southwest Missouri State University, Communication Sciences and Disorders, 901 S. National Avenue, Springfield, MO 65804 USA

SUMMARY

Due to the inheritance patterns of stuttering, children who stutter are likely to have a parent who also stutters. Despite this, most parent-child interactional studies in the field of stuttering are between a child who stutters and an adult parent who does not stutter. This study uses a modified qualitative approach to describe the complex interactions that occur between a child who stutters and her parent, who also stutters. The parent modifies his communication patterns significantly when speaking with his daughter that greatly reduce his stuttering behaviors. Descriptions and examples of conversation are described in detail.

Read more: Conversation Analysis of Children Who Stutter and Parents Who Stutter

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
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non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

Read more: JFD

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