IFA Congresses

Test-Phase Of The German Program For The Evaluation Of Stuttering Therapies (PEVOS)

Test-Phase Of The German Program For The Evaluation Of Stuttering Therapies (PEVOS)

Julia Pape-Neumann1, Hans-Georg Bosshardtz2, Ulrich Natke3, Horst Oertle4
1Bandesvereinigung Stotterer-Selbsthilfe e.l/., Gereonswall 112, 50670 Koln, Germany
2Faculty of Psychology, Rahr- University Bochum, Germany
3Faculty of Experimental Psychology, University Diisseldorfi Germany
4Centre for Stationary Speech Therapy, Bad Salzdetfurth, Germany

SUMMARY

On the initiative of the German self-help organisation the program for the evaluation of stuttering therapies PEVOS (Programm zur Evaluation von Stottertherapien) was developed to evaluate different stuttering therapies over a time period of two years after therapy. The concept was designed by a group of therapists and scientists and was tested since 2001. In the test-phase data were collected from ten therapists with 100 clients. Fluency data were obtained by telephone calls. Functional outcomes and changes in attitudes and emotions were measured with questionnaires. Results of the test-phase’s evaluation including the first two assessments will be presented, organisational problems and possible solutions will be discussed.

Read more: Test-Phase Of The German Program For The Evaluation Of Stuttering Therapies (PEVOS)

Many Types of Data: Stuttering Treatment Outcomes Beyond Fluency

Many Types of Data: Stuttering Treatment Outcomes Beyond Fluency

Robert W. Quesal1, J. Scott Yaruss2, and Lawrence F. Molt3
1Communication Sciences and Disorders, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL 61455, USA
2Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
3Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA

SUMMARY

The purpose of this manuscript is to summarize arguments for supplementing the existing treatment outcomes literature with information drawn from a number of other relevant sources. The paper presents 4 case studies and asks whether existing literature provides all of the information needed to make appropriate treatment recommendations. In some cases, it is clear that the existing literature is helpful; in other cases, however, it appears that additional information is required. The paper concludes with suggestions for other aspects of the stuttering disorder that can be considered in clinical decision making and treatment outcomes research for evaluating the entirety of the experience of stuttering from the perspective of the speaker.

Read more: Many Types of Data: Stuttering Treatment Outcomes Beyond Fluency

Tracking the Progress of Stuttering Treatment Using Subjective Parent Ratings

Tracking the Progress of Stuttering Treatment Using Subjective Parent Ratings

William S. Rosenthal
Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, California State University, Hayward, Hayward, California, 94542, USA

SUMMARY

A parent rating procedure for young children who stutter is described. The procedure is subjective, requires no objective Counts of behavior, but corresponds well with both clinician assessments and objective SSI-3 scores. These parent ratings can be important sources of confirmation about the progress (or lack thereof) observed by clinicians. They are also useful during breaks in therapy, so that significant or alarming changes can be detected early and timely intervention provided. Graphic and statistical analysis of the data shows good correspondence between SSI-3 changes and parent rating changes over the same period of time.

Read more: Tracking the Progress of Stuttering Treatment Using Subjective Parent Ratings

Maintenance of Fluency in Extra-Clinical Settings: Lack of Empirical Data

Maintenance of Fluency in Extra-Clinical Settings: Lack of Empirical Data

Glen Tellis1, Michelle Henning1, and Cari Tellis2
1Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Dept. of Special Education, 259 Davis Hall, Indiana, PA I 5 705
2University of Pittsburgh, Dept. of Communication Disorders

SUMMARY

The long-term maintenance of fluency is the goal of many stuttering therapy programs. Thirty-two years of articles were reviewed to determine how many maintenance studies were conducted. Studies were reviewed for: gender, age, therapy techniques, study duration, and design. Results indicate that there is an acute shortage of published maintenance studies. The review yielded only 25 treatment studies that mentioned maintenance procedures. In the studies that included the maintenance stage of therapy, however, the authors did not agree about the amount, type, and duration of the maintenance programs. More research is needed to address issues in maintenance and relapse.

Read more: Maintenance of Fluency in Extra-Clinical Settings: Lack of Empirical Data

Overall Assessment of The Speaker’s Experience of Stuttering (OASES)

Overall Assessment of The Speaker’s Experience of Stuttering (OASES)

J. Scott Yaruss1 and Robert W. QUESAL2
1Deportment of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
2C0mmunication Sciences and Disorders, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL 61455, USA

SUMMARY

Recent years have seen a renewed interest in measuring treatment outcomes, particularly for broad-based treatment approaches that attempt to achieve changes in a speal<er’s overall communication ability rather than focusing solely or primarily on gains in fluency. Unfortunately, prior attempts to document such treatment outcomes have been hindered by a relative lack of reliable instruments for assessing real-world outcomes. This paper describes the development of a new measurement instrument for assessing several aspects of the speaker’s experience of stuttering, including fluency, personal and environmental reactions, difficulties with functional communication, and the impact of stuttering on the speaker’s quality of life. Preliminary data demonstrating the value of the instrument are presented for 4 individuals who have recently completed a broad-based treatment program.

Read more: Overall Assessment of The Speaker’s Experience of Stuttering (OASES)

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
(
non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

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