IFA Congresses

The Successful Stuttering Management Program: Assessment of Stuttering and Speech Rate

The Successful Stuttering Management Program: Assessment of Stuttering and Speech Rate

Michael Blomgren, Nelson Roy, Tom Callister
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84112, USA

SUMMARY

Nineteen adult stuttering speakers participated in a three-week intensive stuttering modification treatment program (the Successful Stuttering Management Program). Stuttering rate and speech durations were assessed immediately pre-treatment and immediately post-treatment. Stuttering rate was calculated as a percentage of stuttering on an oral reading task and a spontaneous monologue task. Speech durations were calculated as speech rate and articulatory rate. Speech rate was measured as the overall duration of a reading passage and articulatory rate was measured as the average /i/ vowel duration during the reading passage. Based on mean scores, clinically positive trends in decreased stuttering rate were observed post-treatment, however these decreases did not reach statistical significance. Total reading passage duration and vowel durations did not change significantly. Discussion focuses on the possible interplay between stuttering rate "and speech rate and articulatory durations.

Read more: The Successful Stuttering Management Program: Assessment of Stuttering and Speech Rate

Responsiveness to Treatment of Early Stuttering with the Lidcombe Program: Preliminary Results

Responsiveness to Treatment of Early Stuttering with the Lidcombe Program: Preliminary Results

Isabelle Rousseau1, Ann Packman1, Mark Onslow1, and Elisabeth Harrison2
1Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, PO Box I 70, Lidcombe NSW 1870, Australia
2Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University NS W 2109, Australia


SUMMARY

This paper reports an investigation into the relationship between time since onset of stuttering and the duration “of treatment with the Lidcombe Program. The Lidcombe Program of early stuttering intervention is a parent-delivered behavioural treatment. In the past, time since onset has been associated with duration of treatment and these findings are important for deciding whether to begin treatment or to delay treatment to give a chance for natural recovery to occur. However, existing studies are methodologically limited by retrospective methods. The present project incorporates prospective methods, and preliminary data are presented.

Read more: Responsiveness to Treatment of Early Stuttering with the Lidcombe Program: Preliminary Results

Swedish Comprehensive Stuttering Program - Evaluation Two To Four Years After Treatment

Swedish Comprehensive Stuttering Program - Evaluation Two To Four Years After Treatment

Helena Foarne-Wastlund1, 2

1Department of Disability Research, The University of Orebro, Sweden
2Waslund Speech Clinic, BOA Prosodi AB, Orebro, Sweden, Sigillgaian 167SE 703 78 Orebro, Sweden

SUMMARY

The Comprehensive Stuttering Program was introduced to Sweden through a project in 1997- 2000, which included a pilot study of nine stutterers. Two years after therapy each participant was evaluated over the phone by a third person, analysing their spontaneous speech, oral reading; dysfluencies and overall impression of Stuttering Severity. They were asked to evaluate their current communication skills, rate well- being and expectations on a 0 -5 scale of positive statements concerning communication. Evaluation continues. In this section the outcome of the 2 to 4-year follow-up of 33 participants will be presented.

Read more: Swedish Comprehensive Stuttering Program - Evaluation Two To Four Years After Treatment

Longitudinal Treatment Outcome: Four Case Studies

Longitudinal Treatment Outcome: Four Case Studies

Marilyn Langevin and Deborah Kully
Institute for Stuttering Treatment & Research (ISTAR), The University of Alberta, 3rd floor; 8220 - 114 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T5J 2P4

SUMMARY

This report focuses on the process of maintenance for four subjects over a 5 year longitudinal period. Findings indicated that: fluctuations in fluency occurred but were not excessive, slower rates of speech can sound relatively natural, the expectancy to stutter remained salient in spite of good maintenance of speech gains, there were general trends for either maintenance of improved post-treatment confidence in approaching a variety of speech situations or improvement over the follow-up period, and either post treatment normalization of communication attitudes was maintained or normalization was achieved at 5 years. All subjects were maintaining a substantial amount of their post- treatment speech and emotional/attitudinal gains at 5 years follow-up.

Read more: Longitudinal Treatment Outcome: Four Case Studies

Slow Rate Effect on the Fluency of Preschoolers Who Stutter: Clinician-Child Adjacent Utterances

Slow Rate Effect on the Fluency of Preschoolers Who Stutter: Clinician-Child Adjacent Utterances

Jennifer S. Carlson1 and Lisa R. LASALLE2
1Claire Santagati Vatz, M.A., C. C. C., INC., Private Practice, 250 Mt. Lebanon Blvd, Suite 41], Pittsburgh, PA 15234, USA
2University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Communication Disorders Department, 239 Water Street, Eau Claire, WI 54702, USA

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study was to determine if clinicians’ slow speech rates facilitate fluency of preschoolers who stutter. Seven preschoolers who stutter and their clinicians served as participants. Clinicians’ speech rates were categorized into “slow” ( 3.0 syllables per second [SPS]) or “fast” ( 3.33 SPS), and the children’s adjacent utterances as “stuttered” or “normally disfluent/fluent.” As a group, observed probabilities did not differ from expected where the child either stuttered or spoke fluently, based on clinician rate of speech. One boy, however, stuttered significantly more when his clinician spoke quickly, while another boy stuttered significantly more when his clinician spoke slowly.

Read more: Slow Rate Effect on the Fluency of Preschoolers Who Stutter: Clinician-Child Adjacent Utterances

join button

to renew log onto your account and use the
Your Account menu item

Translation

The IFA implemented Japanese translations of some pages on the site for the 2018 Joint World Congress. Choosing Japanese below to see these translations.

Not all pages are translated, but you can use Google translate to see a machine translation using the switch below

Google Translate

JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
(
non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

Read more: JFD

IFA on Twitter

IFA on Facebook