IFA Congresses

Pauses!? Overcoming Reluctance and Demonstrating Necessity

Pauses!? Overcoming Reluctance and Demonstrating Necessity

Peter Toney
National Association Self-help and Initiatives on Stuttering (NASIS),
PO Box 104, I220 Sofia, Bulgaria

SUMMARY

The basic part of our therapy consists of counseling, persuasion and motivating clients to use many pauses in speaking. We combine this instruction with many exercises in different situations and give them the opportunity to practice the skills of (l) differentiating between stuttering blocks and real pauses; and (2) identifying similarities between “long pauses” and natural pauses. Speech style after mastering the use of pauses should appear easier and more fluent than that characterized by moments of tension and stuttering, as in previous utterances. The pauses can serve as a stimulus to reflect on ways to achieve fluent speech.

Read more: Pauses!? Overcoming Reluctance and Demonstrating Necessity

A New Proposal for Therapy: The “Empty Pause”

A New Proposal for Therapy: The “Empty Pause”

Volker Urban
Helmstedter Str. 14,, D-38102 Braunschweig, Germany

SUMMARY

The “Empty Pause” is a new method which consists in having the stutterer interrupt or postpone his attempt to say a “critical” word until he feels that he will succeed in continuing fluently. In doing so he has to tolerate the growing fear of stuttering and has to resist an intense urge to start the speaking attempt right away. There is a proposed hypothesis that this urge plays a crucial role in the explanation of stuttering. It triggers the stuttering events by provoking an acceleration of the articulation or its preparation.

Read more: A New Proposal for Therapy: The “Empty Pause”

The Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with People Who Stutter

The Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with People Who Stutter

Evelyn R. Klein and J. Amster
La Salle University Philadelphia, PA

SUMMARY

This study investigated the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy with People Who Stutter (PWS). Eight adults ranging in age from 27 to 56 years comprised the sample of PWS. Measures of perfectionism, dysfunctional thoughts, and attitudes as well as stuttering severity were taken at baseline, 3 weeks, and 6 weeks after treatment. Use of cognitive behavioral treatment and stuttering modification revealed improvement in PWS’ ability to cope, accept, and reduce perceived negative effects of stuttering in addition to stuttering severity.

Read more: The Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with People Who Stutter

Change: The Key To Success In Stuttering Therapy

Change: The Key To Success In Stuttering Therapy

Barbara Dahm
Communication Therapy Institute, I Hadar Street, Matan 45858 Israel

SUMMARY

Successful stuttering therapy requires well-defined goals that will lead to the generation of fluent speech. The necessity of self-change is mandatory to achieve these goals. The combination of the speech processing model and a six-stage program of change shows how people who stutter can develop effective goals and take specific and appropriate steps to bring about the necessary change. A follow-up study explores how realistic it is to for people who stutter to make 1ong-term change and whether the effort to make self- change is worthwhile.

Read more: Change: The Key To Success In Stuttering Therapy

Easy, Ethical Efficacy 2003

Easy, Ethical Efficacy 2003

Bruce P. Ryan
Communicative Disorders, 1250 Bellfloweig California State University, Long Beach, California, 90840

SUMMARY

Ryan (2001a, 2001b) suggested that it was ethical and possible to evaluate treatment for stuttering using a 10-point rating scale for each of the three dimensions of: (a) pre- posttesting of stuttering, (b) description of procedures, and (c) length of treatment in hours to achieve 30 total points. The revised scale was discussed and explained to the audience. who were given 1 of 5 treatment procedures to rate using the scale during the latter half of the presentation. The results were collected from the audience and analyzed to reveal that certain treatments scored better than others on the scale.

Read more: Easy, Ethical Efficacy 2003

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
(
non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

Read more: JFD

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