IFA Congresses

The Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with People Who Stutter

The Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with People Who Stutter

Evelyn R. Klein and J. Amster
La Salle University Philadelphia, PA

SUMMARY

This study investigated the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy with People Who Stutter (PWS). Eight adults ranging in age from 27 to 56 years comprised the sample of PWS. Measures of perfectionism, dysfunctional thoughts, and attitudes as well as stuttering severity were taken at baseline, 3 weeks, and 6 weeks after treatment. Use of cognitive behavioral treatment and stuttering modification revealed improvement in PWS’ ability to cope, accept, and reduce perceived negative effects of stuttering in addition to stuttering severity.

Read more: The Effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with People Who Stutter

Change: The Key To Success In Stuttering Therapy

Change: The Key To Success In Stuttering Therapy

Barbara Dahm
Communication Therapy Institute, I Hadar Street, Matan 45858 Israel

SUMMARY

Successful stuttering therapy requires well-defined goals that will lead to the generation of fluent speech. The necessity of self-change is mandatory to achieve these goals. The combination of the speech processing model and a six-stage program of change shows how people who stutter can develop effective goals and take specific and appropriate steps to bring about the necessary change. A follow-up study explores how realistic it is to for people who stutter to make 1ong-term change and whether the effort to make self- change is worthwhile.

Read more: Change: The Key To Success In Stuttering Therapy

Easy, Ethical Efficacy 2003

Easy, Ethical Efficacy 2003

Bruce P. Ryan
Communicative Disorders, 1250 Bellfloweig California State University, Long Beach, California, 90840

SUMMARY

Ryan (2001a, 2001b) suggested that it was ethical and possible to evaluate treatment for stuttering using a 10-point rating scale for each of the three dimensions of: (a) pre- posttesting of stuttering, (b) description of procedures, and (c) length of treatment in hours to achieve 30 total points. The revised scale was discussed and explained to the audience. who were given 1 of 5 treatment procedures to rate using the scale during the latter half of the presentation. The results were collected from the audience and analyzed to reveal that certain treatments scored better than others on the scale.

Read more: Easy, Ethical Efficacy 2003

The Successful Stuttering Management Program: Assessment of Stuttering and Speech Rate

The Successful Stuttering Management Program: Assessment of Stuttering and Speech Rate

Michael Blomgren, Nelson Roy, Tom Callister
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84112, USA

SUMMARY

Nineteen adult stuttering speakers participated in a three-week intensive stuttering modification treatment program (the Successful Stuttering Management Program). Stuttering rate and speech durations were assessed immediately pre-treatment and immediately post-treatment. Stuttering rate was calculated as a percentage of stuttering on an oral reading task and a spontaneous monologue task. Speech durations were calculated as speech rate and articulatory rate. Speech rate was measured as the overall duration of a reading passage and articulatory rate was measured as the average /i/ vowel duration during the reading passage. Based on mean scores, clinically positive trends in decreased stuttering rate were observed post-treatment, however these decreases did not reach statistical significance. Total reading passage duration and vowel durations did not change significantly. Discussion focuses on the possible interplay between stuttering rate "and speech rate and articulatory durations.

Read more: The Successful Stuttering Management Program: Assessment of Stuttering and Speech Rate

Responsiveness to Treatment of Early Stuttering with the Lidcombe Program: Preliminary Results

Responsiveness to Treatment of Early Stuttering with the Lidcombe Program: Preliminary Results

Isabelle Rousseau1, Ann Packman1, Mark Onslow1, and Elisabeth Harrison2
1Australian Stuttering Research Centre, The University of Sydney, PO Box I 70, Lidcombe NSW 1870, Australia
2Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University NS W 2109, Australia


SUMMARY

This paper reports an investigation into the relationship between time since onset of stuttering and the duration “of treatment with the Lidcombe Program. The Lidcombe Program of early stuttering intervention is a parent-delivered behavioural treatment. In the past, time since onset has been associated with duration of treatment and these findings are important for deciding whether to begin treatment or to delay treatment to give a chance for natural recovery to occur. However, existing studies are methodologically limited by retrospective methods. The present project incorporates prospective methods, and preliminary data are presented.

Read more: Responsiveness to Treatment of Early Stuttering with the Lidcombe Program: Preliminary Results

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
(
non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

Read more: JFD

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