IFA Congresses

The Dutch Stuttering Primary Prevention Project

The Dutch Stuttering Primary Prevention Project

Caroline Nater-Berkeljon

INSO, Wamveldseweg 47, 7204138, Zutphen, the Netherlands.


SUMMARY

A parental history of stuttering makes children more susceptible to stuttering. Little is known about the effect of primary intervention. The goal of the project was to use primary intervention to reduce the incidence and prevalence of stuttering in young fluently speaking children with a parental history of stuttering. The prevention program was undertaken by 99 fluent speaking children. To date, 93 children have finished the one year program and 65 children have been followed for more than one year. The results obtained so far show that the incidence of stuttering is comparable to that of non-high risk children. Primary prevention is successful to reduce stuttering.

Read more: The Dutch Stuttering Primary Prevention Project

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Child and Parent Variables Pre and Post Therapy

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Child and Parent Variables Pre and Post Therapy

Alison Nicholas, Sharon Millard and Frances Cook
The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, Finsbnry Health Centre, Pine St,

London, UK

SUMMARY

Parent-child interaction (PCI) therapy is an indirect therapy approach for young children who stammer. While there is growing evidence to indicate that it is successful in reducing stammering, there is little known about the impact that this approach may have on other aspects of child development. This study was undertaken to see whether there is evidence for the argument that modification of parents’ interaction styles may have a detrimental effect on children’s language development. Parent and child language and parental participation were measured pre and post therapy. No evidence was found to support the hypothesis that PCI has a detrimental effect on children’s language development.

Read more: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Child and Parent Variables Pre and Post Therapy

Evaluating a Parent/Child Treatment Program for Preschool Children Who Stutter

Evaluating a Parent/Child Treatment Program for Preschool Children Who Stutter

Craig Coleman1, J. Scott Yaruss2, and David Hammer3
1Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Department of Audiology and Communication Disorders and the Stuttering Center of Western Pennsylvania, Corporate One Office Park, Building One, 4055 Monroeville Blvd, Monroeville, PA, 15146
2University of Pittsburgh Department of Communication Science and Disorders and the Stuttering Center of Western Pennsylvania, 4033 Forbes Towel; Pittsburgh, PA 15260
3Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh Department of Audiology and Communication Disorders and the Stuttering Center of Western Pennsylvania, 2599 Wexford Bayne Rd., Sewickly, PA, 15143

SUMMARY

Preliminary results are presented for eleven children ages 218-515 who participated in a six-session parent/child treatment program (Hammer & Yaruss, 1999) to improve speech fluency and communication attitudes. This program combines aspects of both indirect and direct treatment. Preliminary outcomes demonstrated significant changes in fluency for children in their home environment and new situations based on parent ratings and number of disfluencies in the clinical setting. Findings suggest the need for a prospective long-term study to determine the efficacy of the treatment program.

Read more: Evaluating a Parent/Child Treatment Program for Preschool Children Who Stutter

A Multinational Investigation of Stuttering Intervention: Assumptions, Practices, and Lessons

A Multinational Investigation of Stuttering Intervention: Assumptions, Practices, and Lessons

David A. Sharpiro: Professor, Speech-Language Pathologist
Western Carolina University, Communication Disorders Program, Department of Human Services, Killian 204 Cullowhee, North Carolina 28723 USA

Manon Abbink: (representing Poland and Germany) Speech-Language Pathologist, Stuttering Therapist
Almelo, The Netherlands

Melissa Bortz: Speech-Language Pathologist and Coordinator
Multidisciplinary Clinic of the Hillbrow Community Partnership in Health Personnel Education
Johannesburg, South Africa

Andrea Bruna V.: Speech-Language Pathologist
Private Practice, Santiago, Chile

Frances Cook Principal Speech and Language Therapist, Manager
Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, London, England

Peter Dhu: President
Speak Easy Association of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia

Johanna Einarsdottir: Speech and Language Therapist Private Practice
Taljalfun Reykjavikur; Iceland

Elizabeth Haynes: Speech-Language Pathologist
Institute for Stuttering Treatment and Research, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

Sinfree Makoni: Associate Professor Speech-Language Pathologist
Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York USA

Shoko Miyamoto: Speech-Language Pathologist, Doctoral Student
Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan

Lawrence Molt: Chairman, Associate Professor, Speech-Language Pathologist/Audiologist
Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama USA

Nelson Moses (representing Chile): Chairman, Speech-Language Pathologist
Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York USA

Isabella Reichel (representing Russia and Ukraine): Adjunct Professor and Stuttering Specialist
Fluency Renaissance Center, Long Island University, Brooklyn, New York USA

Anne-Marie Simon Assistant Professor, Orthophoniste
Bourg-La Reine, France

Beatriz Biain de Touzet: Professor; Speech-Language Pathologist
Buenos Aires University, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Yvonne Van Zaalen: Speech Therapist, Senior Stuttering Therapist
Praktyk voor Logopedie en Stottertherapie, Amersfoort, The Netherlands

Margaret Marks Wahlhaus: Speech Pathologist and Audiologist, Honorary Research Associate
Australian Stuttering Research Center; University of Sydney, Australia

SUMMARY

The specific purposes of this research were to determine the assumptions, methods, and ultimate lessons learned and purposes served by clinicians who treat people who stutter in diverse nations across the world, and to make comparisons within and across countries and cultures. Seventeen clinician-researchers representing 14 countries across 6 continents each distributed a 10-item survey to an intended sample of 25 clinicians in their own country Who treat people who stutter. The results, both quantitative and qualitative, reveal a commonality of purpose among multinational service providers, the importance of working together and communicating across international borders, and a window into the world as a global classroom.

Read more: A Multinational Investigation of Stuttering Intervention: Assumptions, Practices, and Lessons

Synergistic Stuttering Therapy: The Counseling Connection

Synergistic Stuttering Therapy: The Counseling Connection

Donna K. Cooperman, and Charleen M. Bloom
The College of Saint Rose, Albany, New York, USA 12203

SUMMARY

The synergistic approach to stuttering treatment combines the techniques of fluency shaping and stuttering modification. In this approach, the elements of normal speech production: articulation, phonation and respiration are described and the client is taught to modify these targets in his or her speech to approximate the patterns of normal speakers. At the same time the client learns to explore attitudes and feelings related to stuttering and to understand and modify the environments in which he or she speaks most frequently. The components of the synergistic approach are Speech-Language, Attitudinal, and Environmental. Each of these components operates in an interactive, interrelated mode. I: is because of this perspective tha: the treatment program is described as holistic. As such, the counseling skills of the clinician are fundamental to the treatment program.

Read more: Synergistic Stuttering Therapy: The Counseling Connection

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
(
non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

Read more: JFD

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