IFA Congresses

Work in Progress: An Exploration of Parents’ Experience of the Lidcombe Program

Work in Progress: An Exploration of Parents’ Experience of the Lidcombe Program

Rosemarie Hayhow
Speech and Language Therapy Research Unit, Frerzchay Hospital, Bristol BSI6 LE, UK

SUMMARY

This presentation reports on the preliminary findings from a study that aims to explore parents’ experience of the Lidcombe Program (LP), a parent based treatment for early stuttering. A discussion of why this exploration is being undertaken is followed by consideration of some of the methodological issues that are being addressed. Themes that have emerged from six pilot interviews are presented with a brief discussion of how these will inform the next stage of the study.

Read more: Work in Progress: An Exploration of Parents’ Experience of the Lidcombe Program

Group Therapy for School-Aged Children Who Stutter and Their Parents

Group Therapy for School-Aged Children Who Stutter and Their Parents

Suzana Jelcic Jaksic1 and Mirjana Lasan2
1Croatian Association for People Who Stutter “Hinko F rennd ” and Zagreb Children’s Hospital, Klaiceva 16, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
2Croatian Association for People Who Stutter “Hinko Freund” Klaiceva 16, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia

SUMMARY

This academic. year for the first time, The Croatian Association for People Who Stutter “Hinko Freund,” organized group therapy for school-aged children and their parents. The intervention employed an integral therapy approach to stuttering. Eight boys and girls, ranging in age from 7-11 years, participated. The children met once a week for an hour at a time. Once monthly, at the same time as the children met, parents and/or other family members attended an organized education and group counselling program. Attendance at group therapy included identical pre- and post-therapy evaluations. The results of therapy and directions for the future are discussed.

Read more: Group Therapy for School-Aged Children Who Stutter and Their Parents

Some Factors Influencing Early Referral of Dysfluent Children S

Some Factors Influencing Early Referral of Dysfluent Children

Roberta Lees1, Cameron Stark2, Susan Birse3 and Pam Nicolla4
1Dept. of Speech and Language Therapy, University of Strathclyde, 76 Southbrae Drive, Glasgow, G13 1 PP, Scotland.
2Honorary Senior Lecturer, Highlands and Islands Research Insititute, University of Aberdeen, Scotland.
3Health Information and Resources, Highland Health Board, Inverness, Scotland.
4Royal Northern Infirmary, Ness Walk, Inverness, Scotland.

SUMMARY

Two studies are reported on the attitudes and knowledge of possible direct or indirect referrers of young dysfluent children to speech and language therapy. The first study looked at the referral rates and underlying assumptions held by primary care professionals (general practitioners and health visitors) and the second study investigated understanding of dysfluency and ability to recognise stuttering of pre-school educators. One of the main factors affecting referral by primary care professionals was having training in dysfluency. The majority of pre-school educators wished more training and had little information on aetiology, though a surprising number claimed to be able to recognise stuttering.

Read more: Some Factors Influencing Early Referral of Dysfluent Children S

The Dutch Stuttering Primary Prevention Project

The Dutch Stuttering Primary Prevention Project

Caroline Nater-Berkeljon

INSO, Wamveldseweg 47, 7204138, Zutphen, the Netherlands.


SUMMARY

A parental history of stuttering makes children more susceptible to stuttering. Little is known about the effect of primary intervention. The goal of the project was to use primary intervention to reduce the incidence and prevalence of stuttering in young fluently speaking children with a parental history of stuttering. The prevention program was undertaken by 99 fluent speaking children. To date, 93 children have finished the one year program and 65 children have been followed for more than one year. The results obtained so far show that the incidence of stuttering is comparable to that of non-high risk children. Primary prevention is successful to reduce stuttering.

Read more: The Dutch Stuttering Primary Prevention Project

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Child and Parent Variables Pre and Post Therapy

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Child and Parent Variables Pre and Post Therapy

Alison Nicholas, Sharon Millard and Frances Cook
The Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, Finsbnry Health Centre, Pine St,

London, UK

SUMMARY

Parent-child interaction (PCI) therapy is an indirect therapy approach for young children who stammer. While there is growing evidence to indicate that it is successful in reducing stammering, there is little known about the impact that this approach may have on other aspects of child development. This study was undertaken to see whether there is evidence for the argument that modification of parents’ interaction styles may have a detrimental effect on children’s language development. Parent and child language and parental participation were measured pre and post therapy. No evidence was found to support the hypothesis that PCI has a detrimental effect on children’s language development.

Read more: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy: Child and Parent Variables Pre and Post Therapy

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
(
non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

Read more: JFD

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