IFA Congresses

Self-Help and the International Scene

Self-Help and the International Scene

Jaan Pill
International Stuttering Association, Toronto


Summary

During 15 years of volunteer work, the author has been involved in the founding of the Stuttering Association of Toronto (1988), the Canadian Association for People Who Stutter (1991), the Estonian Association for People Who Stutter (1993), and the International Stuttering Association (1995). Key concepts in this paper include collaboration, development of a sense of ownership, leadership succession, data- orientation, impartiality, clarity in definition of terms, and growth and renewal. The paper defines terms related to self-help, and describes how research on the sociology of self-help offers a framework for analysis of stages of growth in stuttering self-help associations.

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Burn Your Text Books! Evidence-Based Practice in Stuttering Treatment

Burn Your Text Books! Evidence-Based Practice in Stuttering Treatment
Barry Guitar University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05401-0010 

SUMMARY

Stuttering treatment has had a colorful history. Methods of therapy have ranged from Demosthenes’ pebbles to Dieffenbach’s scalpel, from little gold forks in the mouth to little delayed feedback devices in the ear, from exhortations encouraging fluency to admonitions advising more stuttering. Are any of these methods effective? And what do we mean by “effective?” How do we measure it? These are the questions that researchers in the field of stuttering management have been asking for decades. Now the questions should be asked by clinicians, as a habit of their practice. Evidence-based practice is essentially a set of principles for clinicians to use in evaluating and treating their clients. The definition given by one of its developers is that evidence—based practice is “the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.” (Sackett et al., 1996, page 71) The term “current best evidence” includes the latest journal articles and on-line sources of scientifically sound information on evaluation and treatment techniques. Textbooks can be dangerously out of date, unless they are revised very frequently and teach the reader the latest tools for searching the literature. In this paper I will describe they why’s and Why-not’s of evidence—based practice and then make recommendations for clinicians who are interested in following the principles of this philosophy.

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Familial Childhood Stuttering: Stuttering Characteristics and Speech Abilities

Familial Childhood Stuttering: Stuttering Characteristics and Speech Abilities

Suzanne M. Buck1, Roberta Lees1, Peter Martin2, Alison Nicholas3 and Liz Hoey4

1Dept of Speech and Language Therapy, University of Strathclyde, 76 Southbrae Drive, Glasgow, G13 1 PP, UK
2Dept of Educational Studies, University of Strathclyde, 76 Southbrae Drive Glasgow, G13 1 PP, UK
3Michael Palin Centre for Stammering Children, Finsbury Health Centre, Pine Street, London, EC IR OLP, UK
4Speech and Language Therapy, Pollokshaws Clinic, 35 Well Green, Glasgow, G43 IRR, UK

SUMMARY

Whilst research into family histories of stuttering is important, this has rarely been related to the implications for the child. This study explored familial childhood stuttering in contrast to childhood stuttering with no familial factor. Data are presented for 35 young children who stutter, of whom 25 had positive, and 10 had negative family histories of the disorder. These 2 subgroups were compared in terms of stuttering onset, disfluency types, and speech abilities. The results indicate that there are no differences in the stuttering characteristics of children who stutter, between those with and without familial histories of stuttering.

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Genetic Aspects of Stuttering in South Korea

Genetic Aspects of Stuttering in South Korea

Moonja Shin1 and Sungeun Lee2
1Shin’s Speech-Language Clinic, Hae S00 B/D IE Socho-Dong, I360-12 Socho-Gu, Seoul, Korea
2Graduate Program in Speech Pathology, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-Dong Seodaemurz-Gu , Seoul, Korea

SUMMARY

This study investigated the genetic inheritance of 229 stuttering males and females between ages 2 and 45. Subjects were divided into three age groups. 55 percent of subjects reported a family history of stuttering. Females who stuttered were more likely than males who stuttered to have stuttering relatives. Among the preschool and school-age groups, subjects without language difficulties were no more likely than adult subjects to have a family history. Adult subjects without language difficulties were more likely to have a family history. Stuttering-onset ages were earlier for subjects with a family history of stuttering than for subjects without it.

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A Learning Theory Model of Stuttering

A Learning Theory Model of Stuttering

Volker Urban
Helmstedter Str. 14, D-38102 Braunschweig, Germany

SUMMARY

Every stutterer has the ability to speak fluently. Why doesn’t a spontaneous learning process result in the stutterer using this ability all the time? The model presented here emerged from the following observation: When a stutterer interrupts a stuttering event, A he will experience fear and an urge to start speaking again immediately. This urge forms the basis of a new way of understanding stuttering. Various vicious cycles will result in the development of fear in the pause and the avoidance thereof rewards the stuttering.

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
(
non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

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