IFA Congresses

Social Program

Please see below for details of the social program. Registration is now closed, but as you will see below, some of the newly added social events can be booked and paid for at the congress. We have created a varied program of events, but hope that delegates will also socialize informally in small and large groups, exploring and enjoying Hiroshima together! Places can be booked on all social events for friends and family members as well as delegates themselves.

Read more: Social Program

The Use of Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) in a Group Setting with Adults who Stutter

Koichi MORI1

1National Rehabilitation Center for Persons with Disabilities (NRCD), Japan This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Abstract. Stuttering in adulthood is chronic and persistent. Its treatment typically requires many and frequent sessions, which may not be practical for some people who stutter (PWS), and also for clinicians in Japan due to their scarcity. Although the primary reason for using cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is to improve the success rate and overall quality of life (QOL) of PWS, it also enables to relax therapy scheduling. In this study, stuttering was theorized as an assembly of vicious cycle with subconscious conditioned responses, unhelpful cognition and maladaptive coping behaviors. Also postulated was normal speaking capability for most of PWS. The therapy goal was to enable PWS to use their innate ability to speak fluently. For this to be realized, (a) the goal of fluency should be replaced by better communication irrespective of stuttering because maladaptive coping behaviors are triggered by the intent "not to stutter," (b) attention control away from stuttering has to be learned, and (c) how to produce natural speech consciously in any given situation should be learned. Also required are (d) challenges to speak before checking for difficult words. With (a), fluency may be a byproduct of improved communication, but the latter alone should be enough for most PWS in order to participate and play a full role in the society. For (b) and (c) daily mindfulness meditation and speech shadowing should be practiced (5--10 min each). (d) is partially achieved by behavioral therapies specific to stuttering. Special care is needed for those who also clutter. The current group format comprising five 3-hour sessions over 5 weeks generated positive results. 

Read more: The Use of Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) in a Group Setting with Adults who Stutter

The Effects of Reduced Articulation Rate in Caregivers and Preschool Children Who Stutter

Jean SAWYER1, Heidi M. HARBERS2, and Takahisa NAGASE3

1Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

2Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

3Midstate College, Peoria, Illinois This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Abstract. The characteristics of slower articulation rate that facilitate fluency have not been identified. Three 15-minute conversations between 17 preschool children who stutter and their caregivers were recorded at three different articulation rates for the caregivers. The mean number of disfluencies in the children’s speech was significantly smaller during slower rates of the caregivers. An analysis of several measures of language output revealed that children’s language was largely unchanged. Children reduced their number of utterances when caregivers’ rates were slow. Caregivers’ language changed most when articulation was slowed, and included fewer utterances, smaller mean length of utterance, and less lexical diversity.  

Read more: The Effects of Reduced Articulation Rate in Caregivers and Preschool Children Who Stutter

Three-Pronged Approach to the Conceptualization of Cluttering (TPA-CC)

Florence MYERS1, Susanne COOK2,3,  and Charley ADAMS2,4

1Adelphi University, Garden City, NY USA This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

2International Cluttering Association 

3Fairfax County Public Schools, VA USA This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

4University of South Carolina, SC USA This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Abstract.  A recent survey of 70 speech-language pathologists indicated that many clinicians feel they need to learn more about the nature of cluttering (Cook & Adams, 2016).  At the 2016 American-Speech-Language-Hearing Association convention, the Executive Board of the International Cluttering Association formed an ad-hoc committee to develop a functional, consensus-driven definition of cluttering to help facilitate greater understanding of the nature of cluttering.  The committee considered certain premises: that a ‘definition’ of cluttering requires much more research; that reliance on words alone to describe cluttering is not sufficient for the understanding of cluttering; that listening to samples of cluttered speech is obligatory toward understanding the perceptual nature of cluttering; that there is great benefit to be gained by learning from insights shared by people with cluttering (PWC) about their communication.  The Three-Pronged Approach for the Conceptualization of Cluttering (TPA-CC) was thus formulated, unveiled at the World Congress in Hiroshima and subsequently uploaded on the International Cluttering Association website to be universally available to professionals and nonprofessionals.

Read more: Three-Pronged Approach to the Conceptualization of Cluttering (TPA-CC)

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The IFA implemented Japanese translations of some pages on the site for the 2018 Joint World Congress. Choosing Japanese below to see these translations.

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
(
non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

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