IFA Congresses

An Integrated Care System for People Who Stutter

An Integrated Care System for People Who Stutter

Meina Voors1 and Durdana Putker2
1Centrum Voor Stottertherapie Bloemerzdaal, Donkerelaan 64 2061JP Bloemendaal, the Netherlands
2Stottercentrum Zwolle, Huzjgensstraat Ia 8023 AG Zwolle, the Netherlands

SUMMARY

A group of speech specialists in the Netherlands have been developing a new system for treating stuttering, where a network of therapists can enroll their patients in different modules of therapy. Cooperation between speech therapists has resulted in an Integrated Care System for stutterers, where individual and group therapies form an ongoing, long- term treatment.

Read more: An Integrated Care System for People Who Stutter

Student Clinician Preferences for (Not) Working With Stuttering

Student Clinician Preferences for (Not) Working With Stuttering

Margaret M. Leah Y1, Calum M. Delaney2, And Kathleen Murphy1
1Clinical Speech & Language Studies, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
2School of Health and Social Sciences, University of Wales Institute Cardiff , Western Avenue, Cardiff, CF5 2YB, United Kingdom

SUMMARY

Student clinicians in their 3rd and 4th years of study in Ireland and Wales participated in a study of preferences for working with client groups, including people who stutter. Influencing factors for preferences relating to personal and clinical experience of stuttering, subjective evaluation of competencies, and perceptions of stuttering were examined. Results indicated that clinical and non-clinical experiences were not good predictors of students’ preferences for working with people who stutter, and perceptions of competence were similar to those for other client groups. Perceptions of stuttering suggested that it was viewed differently to other client groups. Implications of these findings were discussed.

Read more: Student Clinician Preferences for (Not) Working With Stuttering

Stuttering Therapy in The Schools: Focus Groups With School Clinicians

Stuttering Therapy in The Schools: Focus Groups With School Clinicians

John A. Tetnowski, Jack S. Damico, & Jennifer T. Tetnowski
University Of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 431 70, Lafayette, LA 70504-3170 USA

SUMMARY

Past research has shown that speech-language pathologists lack confidence when working with people who stutter (Brisk, Healey, & Hux, 1997; St. Louis, & Lass, 1981). These data comes primarily from survey, or anecdotal evidence, without in-depth analysis of the causes for this attitude. This study presents results from a series of focus groups with public school clinicians that treat PWS. Results show that clinicians perceive barriers to successful therapy. These barriers include stuttering-specific reasons, such as small incidence of PWS on their caseloads or poor training, as well as organizational-specific reasons, such as lack of flexibility in scheduling and uncooperative teachers.

Read more: Stuttering Therapy in The Schools: Focus Groups With School Clinicians

Building Bridges with Allied Professionals

Building Bridges with Allied Professionals

John Wade1, J. Scott Yaruss2, Lee Reeves3, And Nina Reardon4
1University of Kansas, Counseling and Psychological Services, 2100 Watkins Health Center, Lawrence, KS 66049 USA
2University of Pittsburgh, 4035’ Forbes Tower; Pittsburgh, PA 15260 USA
3National Stuttering Association, 3207 Independence Pkwy, Plano, TX 75075 USA
4Private Practice, 2602 Deer Court, Ottawa, IL 61350 USA

SUMMARY

The purpose of this panel discussion was to consider the importance of collaboration between and among professionals from different fields and with different backgrounds in the treatment and research of stuttering. There are many reasons that collaboration is useful and important. This manuscript summarizes and highlights some of the ways collaboration can enhance clinical practice in stuttering and to suggest ways clinicians can collaborate with other professionals in their attempts to improve the lives of people who stutter.

Read more: Building Bridges with Allied Professionals

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
(
non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

Read more: JFD

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