IFA Congresses

Judgments of Disfluency in a Familiar vs. an Unfamiliar Language

Judgments of Disfluency in a Familiar vs. an Unfamiliar Language

Brian D. Humphrey
Programs in Speech, Language, and Communication Disorders, Nova Southeastern University, 3301 College Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33314, USA

SUMMARY

This study examined whether bilingual English-Spanish speaking judges may be better at making disfluency judgments in Spanish than monolingual English-speaking judges. Both groups judged a Spanish-language narrative to contain a greater percentage of disfluencies than an English-language narrative by the same speaker. However, neither group identified a significantly greater percentage of disfluencies in the Spanish-language narrative. Implications for treatment and directions for further research are discussed.

Read more: Judgments of Disfluency in a Familiar vs. an Unfamiliar Language

“Emotion and Speech” Treatment Approach for Young Children Who Stutter

“Emotion and Speech” Treatment Approach for Young Children Who Stutter

Hiroaki Kobayashii1 and Mizokami Naomi2
1Facility of Education, Kanazawa University, Kakama-rnachi, Kanazawa-shi, Is/*tikawa-ken, 920-1192, Japan
2Graduate School of Education, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima-shi, Hiroshima-ken, 739-8524, Japan

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study was to determine an approach to treatment that focused on an emotional components based on the U hypothesis (Uchisugawa and Hayasaka, 1988) in addition to a speech components. A preschool boy participated in this study. He visited at 3 year and 9 months old for treatment of stuttering. The result shows that the fragility in the emotional/speech areas that were seen at first session improved, and the number of stuttering-like disfluencies decreased. The adjustability and effectiveness of the “Emotion and speech” treatment approach with young children who stutter are discussed based on these results.

Read more: “Emotion and Speech” Treatment Approach for Young Children Who Stutter

Preliminary Study on Effects of Temperament Characteristics on Early Development of Stuttering Children

Preliminary Study on Effects of Temperament Characteristics on Early Development of Stuttering Children

Yoko Wakaba1, Megumi Iizawa1, Keiko Gondo2, Sumiko Inouei3, and Hiroshi Fujino4
1The Research Institute for the Education of Exceptional Children,Tokyo Gakugei University, Nukuikita 4-I-I, Koganei, Tol<yo,]84-850], Japan
2Department of Early Childhood Education, St. Margaret's Junior College, Kugayama 4-29-23, Tokyo,168-8626, Japan
3R&D Center, PIGEON Corporation, 6-20-4, Kinunodai, Yawara-rnura, Tsukuba-gun, Ibaraki, 300-2495, Japan
4Department of Education for Children with Disabilities, Faculty of Education, Tokyo Gakugei University, Nukuikita 4-I-1, Koganei, Tokyo, 184-8501, Japan

SUMMARY

Temperament is considered to be an important factor influencing the onset and development of stuttering in children. Wakaba estimates that one-third of children who stutter can be characterized as a difificult child, a higher proportion than among normally fluent children. This study examines two groups of subjects, five in an “Easy Child” group and five in a “Difficult Child” group. Four data collection strategies were used to assess the developmental history and behavior characteristics of the children and their relationships with their parents. Temperament was found to be a contributory factor in the development of stuttering symptoms associated with tension in the “Difficult Child” group. More subjects need to be studied before these results can be generalized.

Read more: Preliminary Study on Effects of Temperament Characteristics on Early Development of Stuttering...

The Development and Validation of a Communication Attitude Assessment Instrument for Use with Young Children

The Development and Validation of a Communication Attitude Assessment Instrument for Use with Young Children.

Stephen Davis, Peter Howell, Anna Killick, and Hannah Finch
Department of Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT

SUMMARY

The development of a computer-based instrument designed to assess communication attitudes in children up to 7 years is described. The instrument will be included in a battery of tasks to assess and evaluate factors close to stuttering onset to determine whether stuttering will persist or recover. Preliminary analysis indicated that the instrument was reliable and valid. Results replicated previous studies (De Nil & Brutten, 1986, 1991; Boutsen & Brutten, 1989) indicating the communication attitudes of children who stutter were more negative than those of their peers.

Read more: The Development and Validation of a Communication Attitude Assessment Instrument for Use with...

Superordinate and Subtype Stutterer Stereotypes

Superordinate and Subtype Stutterer Stereotypes

Calum M. Delaney
School of Health and Social Sciences, University of Wales Institute Cardiff , Western Avenue, Cardiff, CF5 2YB, United Kingdom

SUMMARY

A study was carried out to investigate differences between a superordinate stereotype (relating to a hypothesised “typical” stutterer) and subtype stereotypes elicited after exposure to 4 stuttering individuals viewed on videotape. 22 participants rated the stutterers on a 6-item semantic differential scale. The results suggested that individuals may hold a variety of stereotypes towards people who stutter, varying in degree rather than the characteristics making up the stereotype, and these were not always negative. The results did not support a subtyping model used to explain stereotype change resulting from exposure to labelled individuals.

Read more: Superordinate and Subtype Stutterer Stereotypes

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
(
non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

Read more: JFD

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