IFA Congresses

Examining Adaptation and Bilingualism in Stuttering

Examining Adaptation and Bilingualism in Stuttering

Nancy E . Hall1 and David L. Evans2
1University of Maine, 5724 Dunn Hall, Orono, ME, 04469, USA
2Private Practice, Los Angeles, CA, USA

SUMMARY

This paper presents the results of an exploratory case study examining the oral-motor rehearsal theory of adaptation by investigating the phenomenon in bilingual people who stu:ter. Through the use of a unique methodology, speakers were asked to read the same passage in one language five times, after which the passage remained the same, but the language changed. This method held linguistic meaning constant, while changing the oral-motor movements. The results are discussed relative to future research efforts.

Read more: Examining Adaptation and Bilingualism in Stuttering

Distribution of Disfluencies According to Word Class Categorization in Brazilian Portuguese

Distribution of Disfluencies According to Word Class Categorization in Brazilian Portuguese

Fabiola Juste and Claudia Regina Furquim de Andrade
Department of Physiotherapy, Speech-Language and Hearing Science and Occupational Therapy, School of Medicine, University of Scio Paulo, Rua Cipotanea 5], Cidade Universitciria, Siio Paulo -S.P., 05360-160, Brazil

SUMMARY

This study aimed to verify the influence of word class in the speech disruptions of fluent and stuttering children, speakers of the Brazilian Portuguese. Participants of this study were 20 stuttering children (GI) and 20 fluent children (GII), 26 males and 14 females, whose ages ranged from 4.0 to 11.11 years. Speech samples were collected and the distribution of frequency of disfluency were classified by type and grammatical class. The results indicate that both groups present a higher number of speech disruptions in closed class words and for GI a small difference was observed for SLD in open class words.

Read more: Distribution of Disfluencies According to Word Class Categorization in Brazilian Portuguese

Aspects of Normally Fluent Speech in Brazilian Adults

Aspects of Normally Fluent Speech in Brazilian Adults

Claudia Regina Furquim de Andrade, Femanda Chiarion Sassi,  Daniela Veronica Zackiewicz
Department of Physiotherapy, Speech-Language and Hearing Science and Occupational Therapy, School of Medicine, University'ofSc'io Paulo, Rua Cipotanea 51, Cidade Universitaria, Siio Paulo - S.P., 05360-160, Brazil

SUMMARY

This study aimed to describe the normally fluent speech of Brazilian Portuguese speaking adults who do not stutter. Speech samples of 30 adults, 13 males and 17 females, whose ages ranged from 20 to 43 years, and had no history of any communication disorders were analyzed and the following measures obtained: speech typology of disruptions (typical and less typical disruptions), speech rate (syllables and words per minute), and rate of disruptions (percentage of speech discontinuity and percentage of stuttered syllables). Mean values and confidence levels and the clinical implications of these findings are presented.

Read more: Aspects of Normally Fluent Speech in Brazilian Adults

Cross-Linguistic Factors in the Prediction of Stuttering Across Age Groups - The Case of German

Cross-Linguistic Factors in the Prediction of Stuttering Across Age Groups - The Case of German

Katharina Dworzynski and Peter Howell
University College London, 26 Bedford Way, London WC1H OAP

SUMMARY

Cross-linguistic research can establish whether stuttering patterns are consistently associated with linguistic structures irrespective of their surface form; or whether difficult motor outputs lead to stuttering independent of the linguistic unit they occur in. A dissociation can be achieved because the same motorically-difficult structures may appear in different linguistic units in different languages. Linguistic factors known to predict dysfluencies in English are investigated in German children and adults who stutter (using Brown’s four factors and J akielski’s index of phonetic complexity). Some cross-linguistic differences were observed. Children were on the whole less affected by linguistic complexity than adults. Results are discussed in light of current theories of fluency failure.

Read more: Cross-Linguistic Factors in the Prediction of Stuttering Across Age Groups - The Case of German

Normal Rates and Disfluencies in French And English

Normal Rates and Disfluencies in French And English

Patricia M. Roberts1 and Ann Meltzer2
1Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, ON KII-I 8M5 Canada
2Stuttering Treatment Clinic, The Rehabilitation Centre, 505 Smyth Road, Ottawa, On. K1H 8M2,

SUMMARY

Most published studies of normal speech disfluencies and rate of speech have reported on English speakers. To adequately serve non-English speaking people who stutter, we -need data on other languages. This paper examines speaking rate and normal speech disfluencies in unilingual English-speaking adults and French-speaking adults during a monologue task. The rate of speech for English and French speakers was similar but the mean number of disfluencies per 100 syllables in the French group was double that of the English group. English norms for normal disfluencies in non-stuttering adults should not be applied to French (Canadian) speech.

Read more: Normal Rates and Disfluencies in French And English

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
(
non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

Read more: JFD

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