IFA Congresses

Model of Speech Fluency Formation in Stuttering Teenagers and Adults

Model of Speech Fluency Formation in Stuttering Teenagers and Adults

Elena Rau, and Elena Kazbanova
Moscow State Pedagogical University, 88, Prospect Vernadskogo, Moscow, Russia

SUMMARY

The purpose of this research was to study the perception and reproduction of non- speech and speech tempo and rhythm in adults and adolescents who stutter. Twenty two stuttering and 20 normally speaking patients took part in the research.. The implications of the findings for the rehabilitation of speech fluency in the case of stuttering with complex training and development of rate and rhythm capability are discussed.

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Kinematic Event Sequencing in Stuttering Adults: Speech, Orofacial Non Speech, and Finger Movements

Kinematic Event Sequencing in Stuttering Adults: Speech, Orofacial Non Speech, and Finger Movements

Ludo Max1,3, Vincent L. Gracco2,3, and Anthony J. Caruso4
1University of Connecticut, Department of Communication Sciences, 850 Bolton Road Unit 1085, Storrs, CT 06269-1085, USA
2McGill University, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 1266 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1A8, Canada
3Haskins Laboratories, 2 70 Crown Street, New Haven, CT 0651] -6695, USA
4Kent State University, School of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Kent, OH44242-001, USA

SUMMARY

Lip and jaw speech movements, lip and jaw nonspeech movements, and finger movements were analyzed to examine whether stuttering adults with no recent speech therapy differ from nonstuttering adults in the sequencing of peak velocity across effectors. Number of movements within a trial and location of the target movements within a trial were experimentally manipulated. Sequencing patterns for stuttering and nonstuttering individuals were similar for two movement types (closing/flexion and opening/extension) in all conditions of the three tasks. Specifically, the order of the most frequently used sequencing patterns was identical for the groups in each task. We conclude that intragestural motor timing as examined here is not impaired in adults who stutter.

Read more: Kinematic Event Sequencing in Stuttering Adults: Speech, Orofacial Non Speech, and Finger Movements

Cerebral Lateraization of Speech Processing in Adult and Child Stutterers: Near Infrared Spectroscopy and MEG Study

Cerebral Lateraization of Speech Processing in Adult and Child Stutterers: Near Infrared Spectroscopy and MEG Study

Koichi Mori1, Yutaka Sato1, Emi Ozawa1 and Satoshi Imaizump2
1National Rehabilitation Center for Persons with Disabilities, 4-] Namiki, Tokorozawa, Saitama, 359-8555, Japan
2Hiroshima Prefectural College of Health Sciences,I -I Gakuen, M ihara, Hiroshima 723-0053, Japan

SUMMARY

Cerebral lateralization of speech processing in stutterers were assessed with noninvasive brain imaging techniques, magnetoencephalography and multichannel near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), with which neuromagnetic and hemodynamic responses, respectively, were recorded to analysis-synthesized prosodic and phonemic minimal contrast word trains. Adult stutterers did not show normal leftward dominance for the phonemic contrast with either method. Children underwent only NIRS sessions, with results similar to those of adults, which indicates that the cerebral dominance in processing heard speech is in disarray even in school-age stutterers. The NIRS method may be useful in screening young stutterers and in elucidating neural correlates of stuttering.

Read more: Cerebral Lateraization of Speech Processing in Adult and Child Stutterers: Near Infrared...

Kinematic Changes Following Static Perturbation in People Who Stutter

Kinematic Changes Following Static Perturbation in People Who Stutter

Aravind Kumar Namasivayam and Pascal H.H.M. Van Lieshout

Oral Dynamics Laboratory, Graduate Department of Speech-Language Pathology University of Toronto, 500 University Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 1 V7, Canada.

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not persons who stutter (PWS) could compensate to the presence of a static (bite-block) perturbation. We hypothesized that, if PWS have a limited ability in utilizing sensory information then they would be unable to adequately control their lip movements to deal with the fixed jaw position. Results indicated that PWS like their matched controls were able to compensate for the presence of a static perturbation. However, there were differences between the two groups in terms of their use of motor control strategies during compensation.

Read more: Kinematic Changes Following Static Perturbation in People Who Stutter

Sensory Integration and Stuttering Therapy

Sensory Integration and Stuttering Therapy

Caroline Nater-Berkeljon
Stottercentrum Rijnlana’, Hazenboslaan 38, 2341 SC, Oegstgeest, the Netherlands

SUMMARY

Sensory integration is the way we take in information, organize and process this information to give an appropriate response. Comprehension of the process of sensory integration makes it possible to understand why a child has a speech problem. As sensory dysfunction could be a handicap to speak fluently. Speech fluency goals are therefore easier achieved by starting to train the sensory integration in the first place. Sensory integration is also useful to modify stuttering, to increase toleranace to stuttering and to facilitate or automate speech-behaviors.

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
(
non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

Read more: JFD

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