IFA Congresses

Sociolinguistic Investigation into Stuttering Identity

Sociolinguistic Investigation into Stuttering Identity

Y. Charlie Watanabe1, Patricia M. Zebrowski2, and Richard Hurtig2
1Nanzan University, 27 Seirei-cho, Seto City, 489-0863, Japan
2Iowa University, 119 WJSHC, Iowa city, IA 52242, USA

SUMMARY

Taking seriously the idea that the social aspect plays an important part in the problem of stuttering, this study uses sociolinguistic discourse analysis to bring into relief discursive practices of a person who stutters (S) and his nonstuttering spouse (NS). Aparticular focus is placed on how the participants negotiate the attribution of a problematic characteristic in the stuttering spouse’s interactional behavior. The analysis showed that NS is required to carry out delicate interactional management due to a blurry distinction between S’s personality trait and his network trait. Usefulness of sociolinguistic discourse analysis in stuttering research is also suggested.

Read more: Sociolinguistic Investigation into Stuttering Identity

Characteristic Features of Single-Syllable Word Repetitions in Preschool Children Who Stutter and Controls

Characteristic Features of Single-Syllable Word Repetitions in Preschool Children Who Stutter and Controls

Melanie van Ark, Patricia Sandrieser, Ulrich Natke, Reinhard Pietrowsky and Karl Theodor Kalveram
Institute of Experimental Psychology, Heinrich-Heine-University Dusseldorf Universitatsstr. 1, 40225 Diisseldozf Germany

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in single-syllable word repetitions between preschool children who stutter and children who do not stutter. The participants of this study were 24 children aged 2.1 to 5.0 years who stutter and a control group matched in sex and age. Audio- and videotaped speech samples consisting of at least 1000 syllables were analysed regarding frequency, number of repetition units, and pause duration of single-syllable word repetitions. Results showed that frequency and number of iterations of single-syllable word repetitions differentiate the two groups, and that the group of children who stutter produced significantly shorter single-syllable word repetitions than the control group.

Read more: Characteristic Features of Single-Syllable Word Repetitions in Preschool Children Who Stutter and...

Analysis of Recast Outcomes in Conversations Between CWS and Parents

Analysis of Recast Outcomes in Conversations Between CWS And Parents

Amy L. Weiss
Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Iowa, 120B SH C, Iowa City, IA USA 52242-1012

SUMMARY

This study followed up a preliminary investigation (Weiss, 2002) that substantiated the presence of recasts in the child-directed language repertoires of parents of school age CWS and CWNS. Further analyses demonstrated that parents of CWS varied in the types and frequencies of their recast productions. As a group, children’s utterances following their parents’ recasts were not more significantly likely to contain disfluencies and as a group the children’s utterances were less lengthy and complex than the average utterances in their samples. For individual parent-child dyads, however, the use of recasts by their parents yielded attempts at more complex syntactic structures.

Read more: Analysis of Recast Outcomes in Conversations Between CWS and Parents

Verbal Behavior of Listeners Interacting with a Person Who Stutters

Verbal Behavior of Listeners Interacting with a Person Who Stutters


Debora Freud, Ronit Sharir and Ruth Ezrati-Vinacour
Department of Communication Disorders, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study is to investigate (a) whether listeners speak faster to adult PWS than to fluent speakers, and (b) whether listeners interrupt, reinforce and complete PWS’ speech more frequently than fluent speakers’ speech. Ten adult listeners spoke once with an adult PWS and once with a fluent speaker. Analysis of speech samples demonstrated that the listeners spoke faster to the PWS than to the fluent speaker. No significant differences were found between listeners’ interruptions, sentence completion and reinforcement to the two speakers. However, listeners performed more interruptions and sentence completions while the PWS was stuttering than while speaking fluently

Read more: Verbal Behavior of Listeners Interacting with a Person Who Stutters

Realizations of Linguistic Stress in Preschool Children Who Stutter and Controls

Realizations of Linguistic Stress in Preschool Children Who Stutter and Controls

Ulrich Natke, Patricia Sandrierser, Claas P. Bendels, Reinhard Pietrowsky, and Karl Theodor Kalveram
Institute of Experimental Psychology, Heinrich-Heine- University Dusseldorf Universitattsstr 1, 40225 Dusseldorf, Germany

SUMMARY

The purpose of the study was to compare realizations of linguistic stress in stuttering and non- stuttering children. Participants were 24 children who stutter and 24 fluently speaking children aged 2.1 to 5.0 years. Controls were matched according to age and sex. In a picture naming task children produced 30 words with different prosodic patterns. Vowel duration was determined as one parameter characterizing linguistic stress for perceptually fluent long stressed, short stressed and unstressed syllables. It was found that children who stutter produced longer vowel durations in long stressed syllables than children who do not stutter. Results are discussed with regard to sensorimotor automation processes in early speech development.

Read more: Realizations of Linguistic Stress in Preschool Children Who Stutter and Controls

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
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non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

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