IFA Congresses

Analysis of Recast Outcomes in Conversations Between CWS and Parents

Analysis of Recast Outcomes in Conversations Between CWS And Parents

Amy L. Weiss
Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Iowa, 120B SH C, Iowa City, IA USA 52242-1012

SUMMARY

This study followed up a preliminary investigation (Weiss, 2002) that substantiated the presence of recasts in the child-directed language repertoires of parents of school age CWS and CWNS. Further analyses demonstrated that parents of CWS varied in the types and frequencies of their recast productions. As a group, children’s utterances following their parents’ recasts were not more significantly likely to contain disfluencies and as a group the children’s utterances were less lengthy and complex than the average utterances in their samples. For individual parent-child dyads, however, the use of recasts by their parents yielded attempts at more complex syntactic structures.

Read more: Analysis of Recast Outcomes in Conversations Between CWS and Parents

Verbal Behavior of Listeners Interacting with a Person Who Stutters

Verbal Behavior of Listeners Interacting with a Person Who Stutters


Debora Freud, Ronit Sharir and Ruth Ezrati-Vinacour
Department of Communication Disorders, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel.

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study is to investigate (a) whether listeners speak faster to adult PWS than to fluent speakers, and (b) whether listeners interrupt, reinforce and complete PWS’ speech more frequently than fluent speakers’ speech. Ten adult listeners spoke once with an adult PWS and once with a fluent speaker. Analysis of speech samples demonstrated that the listeners spoke faster to the PWS than to the fluent speaker. No significant differences were found between listeners’ interruptions, sentence completion and reinforcement to the two speakers. However, listeners performed more interruptions and sentence completions while the PWS was stuttering than while speaking fluently

Read more: Verbal Behavior of Listeners Interacting with a Person Who Stutters

Realizations of Linguistic Stress in Preschool Children Who Stutter and Controls

Realizations of Linguistic Stress in Preschool Children Who Stutter and Controls

Ulrich Natke, Patricia Sandrierser, Claas P. Bendels, Reinhard Pietrowsky, and Karl Theodor Kalveram
Institute of Experimental Psychology, Heinrich-Heine- University Dusseldorf Universitattsstr 1, 40225 Dusseldorf, Germany

SUMMARY

The purpose of the study was to compare realizations of linguistic stress in stuttering and non- stuttering children. Participants were 24 children who stutter and 24 fluently speaking children aged 2.1 to 5.0 years. Controls were matched according to age and sex. In a picture naming task children produced 30 words with different prosodic patterns. Vowel duration was determined as one parameter characterizing linguistic stress for perceptually fluent long stressed, short stressed and unstressed syllables. It was found that children who stutter produced longer vowel durations in long stressed syllables than children who do not stutter. Results are discussed with regard to sensorimotor automation processes in early speech development.

Read more: Realizations of Linguistic Stress in Preschool Children Who Stutter and Controls

Model of Speech Fluency Formation in Stuttering Teenagers and Adults

Model of Speech Fluency Formation in Stuttering Teenagers and Adults

Elena Rau, and Elena Kazbanova
Moscow State Pedagogical University, 88, Prospect Vernadskogo, Moscow, Russia

SUMMARY

The purpose of this research was to study the perception and reproduction of non- speech and speech tempo and rhythm in adults and adolescents who stutter. Twenty two stuttering and 20 normally speaking patients took part in the research.. The implications of the findings for the rehabilitation of speech fluency in the case of stuttering with complex training and development of rate and rhythm capability are discussed.

Read more: Model of Speech Fluency Formation in Stuttering Teenagers and Adults

Kinematic Event Sequencing in Stuttering Adults: Speech, Orofacial Non Speech, and Finger Movements

Kinematic Event Sequencing in Stuttering Adults: Speech, Orofacial Non Speech, and Finger Movements

Ludo Max1,3, Vincent L. Gracco2,3, and Anthony J. Caruso4
1University of Connecticut, Department of Communication Sciences, 850 Bolton Road Unit 1085, Storrs, CT 06269-1085, USA
2McGill University, School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 1266 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1A8, Canada
3Haskins Laboratories, 2 70 Crown Street, New Haven, CT 0651] -6695, USA
4Kent State University, School of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Kent, OH44242-001, USA

SUMMARY

Lip and jaw speech movements, lip and jaw nonspeech movements, and finger movements were analyzed to examine whether stuttering adults with no recent speech therapy differ from nonstuttering adults in the sequencing of peak velocity across effectors. Number of movements within a trial and location of the target movements within a trial were experimentally manipulated. Sequencing patterns for stuttering and nonstuttering individuals were similar for two movement types (closing/flexion and opening/extension) in all conditions of the three tasks. Specifically, the order of the most frequently used sequencing patterns was identical for the groups in each task. We conclude that intragestural motor timing as examined here is not impaired in adults who stutter.

Read more: Kinematic Event Sequencing in Stuttering Adults: Speech, Orofacial Non Speech, and Finger Movements

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JFD

Journal of Fluency DisordersBrowse the current issue
(
non-members)

The official journal of the International Fluency Association
IFA Members receive online access to JFD as a member benefit.

Read more: JFD

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