2003 IFA Congress: Montreal, Canada

Characteristic Features of Single-Syllable Word Repetitions in Preschool Children Who Stutter and Controls

Characteristic Features of Single-Syllable Word Repetitions in Preschool Children Who Stutter and Controls

Melanie van Ark, Patricia Sandrieser, Ulrich Natke, Reinhard Pietrowsky and Karl Theodor Kalveram
Institute of Experimental Psychology, Heinrich-Heine-University Dusseldorf Universitatsstr. 1, 40225 Diisseldozf Germany

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in single-syllable word repetitions between preschool children who stutter and children who do not stutter. The participants of this study were 24 children aged 2.1 to 5.0 years who stutter and a control group matched in sex and age. Audio- and videotaped speech samples consisting of at least 1000 syllables were analysed regarding frequency, number of repetition units, and pause duration of single-syllable word repetitions. Results showed that frequency and number of iterations of single-syllable word repetitions differentiate the two groups, and that the group of children who stutter produced significantly shorter single-syllable word repetitions than the control group.

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Sociolinguistic Investigation into Stuttering Identity

Sociolinguistic Investigation into Stuttering Identity

Y. Charlie Watanabe1, Patricia M. Zebrowski2, and Richard Hurtig2
1Nanzan University, 27 Seirei-cho, Seto City, 489-0863, Japan
2Iowa University, 119 WJSHC, Iowa city, IA 52242, USA

SUMMARY

Taking seriously the idea that the social aspect plays an important part in the problem of stuttering, this study uses sociolinguistic discourse analysis to bring into relief discursive practices of a person who stutters (S) and his nonstuttering spouse (NS). Aparticular focus is placed on how the participants negotiate the attribution of a problematic characteristic in the stuttering spouse’s interactional behavior. The analysis showed that NS is required to carry out delicate interactional management due to a blurry distinction between S’s personality trait and his network trait. Usefulness of sociolinguistic discourse analysis in stuttering research is also suggested.

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Conversation Analysis of Children Who Stutter and Parents Who Stutter

Conversation Analysis of Children Who Stutter and Parents Who Stutter

John A. Tetnowski1, Jack S. Damico1, Jennifer A. Bathel1 & Thomas C. Franklin2
1University of Louisiana at Lafayette, R0. Box 43] 70, Lafayette, LA 70504-3170 USA
2Southwest Missouri State University, Communication Sciences and Disorders, 901 S. National Avenue, Springfield, MO 65804 USA

SUMMARY

Due to the inheritance patterns of stuttering, children who stutter are likely to have a parent who also stutters. Despite this, most parent-child interactional studies in the field of stuttering are between a child who stutters and an adult parent who does not stutter. This study uses a modified qualitative approach to describe the complex interactions that occur between a child who stutters and her parent, who also stutters. The parent modifies his communication patterns significantly when speaking with his daughter that greatly reduce his stuttering behaviors. Descriptions and examples of conversation are described in detail.

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Negotiation Patterns of Families with Stuttering and Non-Stuttering Children

Negotiation Patterns of Families with Stuttering and Non-Stuttering Children

Christa L. Shuman, M. A., and A. Richard Mallard, Ph. D./CCC-SLP Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study was to determine if families with stuttering children and families with non-stuttering children differed for the variables of number of turns, number of turns with questions, number of interruptions, or total negotiation time "during a negotiation task. The experimental (S) group included ten families with a child who stuttered and the control (NS) group included ten families with children who did not stutter matched to children in the experimental group. Significant differences were not found for turns, interruptions, turns with questions, or total negotiation time. A significant interaction difference existed between the groups for number of interruptions.

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A Temporal Analysis of Disfluencies in Children Who Stutter Close to Onset and Controls

A Temporal Analysis of Disfluencies in Children Who Stutter Close to Onset and Controls

Patricia Sandrieder, Ulrich Natke, Melanie van Ark, Reinhard Pietrowsky and Karl Theodor Kalveram
Heinrich-Heine-University Diisseldotf, Institute of Experimental Psychology, Universitiitsstrasse I, 40225 Diisseldorf, Germany

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal proportion of normal disfluencies in children who stutter (CWS) and those who do not (CWNS). The participants of the study were 12 children who do stutter and were close to onset of stuttering, and a control group. The frequency and duration of stuttering-like disfluencies (SLD) and other disfluencies (OD), including pauses were analyzed from audio- and video-taped speech samples consisting of at least 1000 syllables. No significant differences in the proportion of OD were found for CWS and CWNS or for CWS with or without remission. OD are shown to be highly significant dependent on age.

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