2003 IFA Congress: Montreal, Canada

Many Types of Data: Stuttering Treatment Outcomes Beyond Fluency

Many Types of Data: Stuttering Treatment Outcomes Beyond Fluency

Robert W. Quesal1, J. Scott Yaruss2, and Lawrence F. Molt3
1Communication Sciences and Disorders, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL 61455, USA
2Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA
3Department of Communication Disorders, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA

SUMMARY

The purpose of this manuscript is to summarize arguments for supplementing the existing treatment outcomes literature with information drawn from a number of other relevant sources. The paper presents 4 case studies and asks whether existing literature provides all of the information needed to make appropriate treatment recommendations. In some cases, it is clear that the existing literature is helpful; in other cases, however, it appears that additional information is required. The paper concludes with suggestions for other aspects of the stuttering disorder that can be considered in clinical decision making and treatment outcomes research for evaluating the entirety of the experience of stuttering from the perspective of the speaker.

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Test-Phase Of The German Program For The Evaluation Of Stuttering Therapies (PEVOS)

Test-Phase Of The German Program For The Evaluation Of Stuttering Therapies (PEVOS)

Julia Pape-Neumann1, Hans-Georg Bosshardtz2, Ulrich Natke3, Horst Oertle4
1Bandesvereinigung Stotterer-Selbsthilfe e.l/., Gereonswall 112, 50670 Koln, Germany
2Faculty of Psychology, Rahr- University Bochum, Germany
3Faculty of Experimental Psychology, University Diisseldorfi Germany
4Centre for Stationary Speech Therapy, Bad Salzdetfurth, Germany

SUMMARY

On the initiative of the German self-help organisation the program for the evaluation of stuttering therapies PEVOS (Programm zur Evaluation von Stottertherapien) was developed to evaluate different stuttering therapies over a time period of two years after therapy. The concept was designed by a group of therapists and scientists and was tested since 2001. In the test-phase data were collected from ten therapists with 100 clients. Fluency data were obtained by telephone calls. Functional outcomes and changes in attitudes and emotions were measured with questionnaires. Results of the test-phase’s evaluation including the first two assessments will be presented, organisational problems and possible solutions will be discussed.

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Slow Rate Effect on the Fluency of Preschoolers Who Stutter: Clinician-Child Adjacent Utterances

Slow Rate Effect on the Fluency of Preschoolers Who Stutter: Clinician-Child Adjacent Utterances

Jennifer S. Carlson1 and Lisa R. LASALLE2
1Claire Santagati Vatz, M.A., C. C. C., INC., Private Practice, 250 Mt. Lebanon Blvd, Suite 41], Pittsburgh, PA 15234, USA
2University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Communication Disorders Department, 239 Water Street, Eau Claire, WI 54702, USA

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study was to determine if clinicians’ slow speech rates facilitate fluency of preschoolers who stutter. Seven preschoolers who stutter and their clinicians served as participants. Clinicians’ speech rates were categorized into “slow” ( 3.0 syllables per second [SPS]) or “fast” ( 3.33 SPS), and the children’s adjacent utterances as “stuttered” or “normally disfluent/fluent.” As a group, observed probabilities did not differ from expected where the child either stuttered or spoke fluently, based on clinician rate of speech. One boy, however, stuttered significantly more when his clinician spoke quickly, while another boy stuttered significantly more when his clinician spoke slowly.

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Longitudinal Treatment Outcome: Four Case Studies

Longitudinal Treatment Outcome: Four Case Studies

Marilyn Langevin and Deborah Kully

Institute for Stuttering Treatment & Research (ISTAR), The University of Alberta, 3rd floor; 8220 - 114 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, T5J 2P4

SUMMARY

This report focuses on the process of maintenance for four subjects over a 5 year longitudinal period. Findings indicated that: fluctuations in fluency occurred but were not excessive, slower rates of speech can sound relatively natural, the expectancy to stutter remained salient in spite of good maintenance of speech gains, there were general trends for either maintenance of improved post-treatment confidence in approaching a variety of speech situations or improvement over the follow-up period, and either post treatment normalization of communication attitudes was maintained or normalization was achieved at 5 years. All subjects were maintaining a substantial amount of their post- treatment speech and emotional/attitudinal gains at 5 years follow-up.

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Swedish Comprehensive Stuttering Program - Evaluation Two To Four Years After Treatment

Swedish Comprehensive Stuttering Program - Evaluation Two To Four Years After Treatment

Helena Foarne-Wastlund1, 2

1Department of Disability Research, The University of Orebro, Sweden

2Waslund Speech Clinic, BOA Prosodi AB, Orebro, Sweden, Sigillgaian 167SE 703 78 Orebro, Sweden

SUMMARY

The Comprehensive Stuttering Program was introduced to Sweden through a project in 1997- 2000, which included a pilot study of nine stutterers. Two years after therapy each participant was evaluated over the phone by a third person, analysing their spontaneous speech, oral reading; dysfluencies and overall impression of Stuttering Severity. They were asked to evaluate their current communication skills, rate well- being and expectations on a 0 -5 scale of positive statements concerning communication. Evaluation continues. In this section the outcome of the 2 to 4-year follow-up of 33 participants will be presented.

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