2003 IFA Congress: Montreal, Canada

Fluency Development and Temperament in Fluent Children and Children Who Stutter

Fluency Development and Temperament in Fluent Children and Children Who Stutter

Peter Howell1, Stephen Davis1, Hina Patel1, Paul Cuniffe1, Deborah Downing-Wilson1, James Au-Yeung1 and Roberta Williams2
1University College London, 26 Bedford Way, London WC1H 0AP
2City University, Northampton Square, London EC1V OHB

SUMMARY

Some interim results of a longitudinal study into indicators of fluency development are reported. A variety of language tests were performed. OCDI (Oxford Communication Development Inventory) scores were obtained at about 18 months and errors in naming pictures were obtained on a group of the children around this age. MLU (mean length of utterance) and a receptive measure of syntax (ROST - Reception of Syntax Test) were obtained when the children were around three years. CD1 correlated negatively with picture naming errors and this might reflect lexical development. MLU correlated with ROST score and this might reflect syntactic development. Measures of temperament obtained at 3 years did not correlate markedly with any language measure. It is concluded that there are two language factors that affect fluency development (lexical and syntactic), neither of which is related to temperament. In older fluent children and children who stutter temperament was found to differentiate the groups (CD1, MLU and picture naming are not appropriate tests for these older children). It is concluded that temperament may differentiate children who stutter from fluent speakers independent of their language performance.

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A Preliminary Analysis of Interaction Characteristics Between Chronic Stuttering Japanese Children and Their Mothers

A Preliminary Analysis of Interaction Characteristics Between Chronic Stuttering Japanese Children and Their Mothers

Keiko Gongdo1, Yoko Walaba2, Sumiko Inoue2,3 Megumi Iizawa3, and Hiroshi Fujino4
1Department of Early Childhood Education, St. Margaret's Junior College, 4-29-23, Kugayama, Suginami-ku, Tokyo, 168-8626, Japan
2The Research Institute for the Education of Exceptional Children , Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuilfita-machi, Koganei-city, Tokyo, 184-8501, Japan
3R&D Center, PIGEON Corporation, 6-20-4, Kinunodai, Yawara-mura, Tsukuba-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 300-2495, Japan
4Department of Education for Children with Disabilities, F uculty of Education, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 NukuiKita-machi, Koganei-city, Tokyo, 184-8501, Japan

SUMMARY

The purpose of this study was to compare interaction characteristics between a group of 9-year-old Japanese stuttering children (N :3) and their mothers during free play to those of a control group of nonstuttering children (N :3) and their mothers. A 10-minute play session for each pair was analyzed in terms of a number of utterances, number of topic initiations, MLU, a number of interruptions and conversational functions. Subjects in the stuttering group showed fewer interruptions during the conversation than the subjects in the non-stuttering group. Conversational functions varied among subjects; however, 2 mothers of the stuttering group showed a tendency to control their children’s behaviors.

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Overall Assessment of The Speaker’s Experience of Stuttering (OASES)

Overall Assessment of The Speaker’s Experience of Stuttering (OASES)

J. Scott Yaruss1 and Robert W. QUESAL2
1Deportment of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
2C0mmunication Sciences and Disorders, Western Illinois University, Macomb, IL 61455, USA

SUMMARY

Recent years have seen a renewed interest in measuring treatment outcomes, particularly for broad-based treatment approaches that attempt to achieve changes in a speal<er’s overall communication ability rather than focusing solely or primarily on gains in fluency. Unfortunately, prior attempts to document such treatment outcomes have been hindered by a relative lack of reliable instruments for assessing real-world outcomes. This paper describes the development of a new measurement instrument for assessing several aspects of the speaker’s experience of stuttering, including fluency, personal and environmental reactions, difficulties with functional communication, and the impact of stuttering on the speaker’s quality of life. Preliminary data demonstrating the value of the instrument are presented for 4 individuals who have recently completed a broad-based treatment program.

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Maintenance of Fluency in Extra-Clinical Settings: Lack of Empirical Data

Maintenance of Fluency in Extra-Clinical Settings: Lack of Empirical Data

Glen Tellis1, Michelle Henning1, and Cari Tellis2
1Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Dept. of Special Education, 259 Davis Hall, Indiana, PA I 5 705
2University of Pittsburgh, Dept. of Communication Disorders

SUMMARY

The long-term maintenance of fluency is the goal of many stuttering therapy programs. Thirty-two years of articles were reviewed to determine how many maintenance studies were conducted. Studies were reviewed for: gender, age, therapy techniques, study duration, and design. Results indicate that there is an acute shortage of published maintenance studies. The review yielded only 25 treatment studies that mentioned maintenance procedures. In the studies that included the maintenance stage of therapy, however, the authors did not agree about the amount, type, and duration of the maintenance programs. More research is needed to address issues in maintenance and relapse.

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Tracking the Progress of Stuttering Treatment Using Subjective Parent Ratings

Tracking the Progress of Stuttering Treatment Using Subjective Parent Ratings

William S. Rosenthal
Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, California State University, Hayward, Hayward, California, 94542, USA

SUMMARY

A parent rating procedure for young children who stutter is described. The procedure is subjective, requires no objective Counts of behavior, but corresponds well with both clinician assessments and objective SSI-3 scores. These parent ratings can be important sources of confirmation about the progress (or lack thereof) observed by clinicians. They are also useful during breaks in therapy, so that significant or alarming changes can be detected early and timely intervention provided. Graphic and statistical analysis of the data shows good correspondence between SSI-3 changes and parent rating changes over the same period of time.

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